Bega District Letters to the Editor, November 3

A car crash at Tathra late Monday saw the driver of a Nissan ute hospitalised and power cut to the town, while the elderly couple in the white sedan escaped unharmed.
A car crash at Tathra late Monday saw the driver of a Nissan ute hospitalised and power cut to the town, while the elderly couple in the white sedan escaped unharmed.

Back on the radar

It would appear Bega Valley councillors do not realise that “no” means “no”. I am personally beginning to believe that the inmates are in charge of the asylum.

Just when you thought all was well with council the Chinese flight school at Frogs Hollow is back on the radar. Sports Aviation has also taken out a two-page ad in this paper to sell it to you. Nowhere in this ad does it mention any of the negatives.

It will probably be viewed as discriminatory but given the current tensions between the Western World and Nth Korea and China, is it wise to be training 1200 pilots a year?

Further on in the article it mentions opening up many such facilities across Australia. Won’t they be great places to gather intelligence?

Aside from this as I have mentioned in previous articles there are real dangers in having this type of facility with complete amateurs flying over our homes.

In 2017 alone there were three major Incidents at Bankstown Airport. Google Bankstown Airport crashes over at least the last 10 years and you won’t want to be anywhere near Frogs Hollow if this idiotic scheme becomes a reality.

An additional negative will be noise and the disruption to farm livestock.

Usually when something appears to be too good to be true, it is. This is not about all these wonderful benefits to residents. It is about some people making big bucks.

Get the message councillors, don’t approve the DA.

Frank Pearce, Bega

Not the full story

Forestry Corporation's claim that firewood was previously reported under another category (BDN, Letters 31/10) is not entirely correct.

According to Forests NSW 2005 ESFM plan, 4500 tonnes of commercial firewood and 1579 tonnes of domestic firewood were sourced from the South Coast region in 2002-2003. This volume, signed off by former Minister Ian Macdonald, is 48 times greater than the recent information, from NSW Minister for Primary Industries Niall Blair. 

Robert Bertram, Bermagui

Guns out of hiding

Has the stated  aim of the National Firearms Amnesty to reduce the number of unregistered guns in Australia had  the unwanted result of actually  increasing the number of guns in circulation in our region?

Senator LLeyonjhelm, a pro-gun advocate, reported to the gun lobby during the time of the amnesty, “We can be comforted in the knowledge that the Australian people have dumped 25,000 antique, inoperative, neglected, or unwanted firearms on the doorsteps of our law enforcement agencies”.

While unregistered guns handed to the local police station could have been registered at no cost or penalty, and then returned to their licenced owners, the unwanted illegal firearms were destined to be scrapped and taken out of the market.

With minor variations from one state to another It was a different agreement with a firearm handed in to a gun dealer. This one may have been scrapped, or it could have been registered and returned to its owner for a slight, agreed upon charge. The largely unpublicised alternative was that the firearm  was then eligible for sale  by the dealer to another recreational  shooter as long as he/she agreed to the price and passed minimal licence requirements.

A victory for the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia  and  a bonanza for participating firearms dealers who could have more guns to sell as a result of the current amnesty. Is an unregistered, never used gun hidden in the ceiling more dangerous than when it is dusted down, registered and sold to an enthusiastic recreational hunter?

Why were  gun dealers given such an important role in  carrying out an effective gun amnesty when they have a vested interest in the outcome?

Susan Cruttenden, Dalmeny