Bega district letters to the editor, September 15

Andy Willis "works from anywhere" in the Bega District News office last Friday. The entrepreneur shares tools and tips to local small businesses.
Andy Willis "works from anywhere" in the Bega District News office last Friday. The entrepreneur shares tools and tips to local small businesses.

Monument to parochialism

The latest proposal from the halls of power to yet again shaft Bega with the parochial proposal to move the Regional Art Gallery to Merimbula is just the final straw in an ongoing campaign to undermine the regional centre of the shire.

The regional art gallery should be upstairs in the civic centre where it was proposed when the original drawings were done for the new centre. This is a beautiful space looking out across Mumbulla Mountain.

No consultation on the movement of the council chambers to a portion of the proposed art gallery space. The new chamber has no soul – it is just another meeting room where the audience cannot hear a word said.

The Christmas festivities in Littleton Gardens have been ruined by the addition of sculptures and other paraphernalia to the garden which mean the gardens are not open enough to swing a cat let alone hold a celebration event. 

On top of the fact the whole shire is now paying back massive debts incurred by the council for works in Merimbula and Eden, we find we do not even have enough funds left to maintain a decent road programs (at least this is shire-wide).

Now we hear this further monument to council’s parochialism is proposed by staff without any consultation or consideration for the huge financial and personal impact this will have on the whole northern end of the shire. Where is the “business plan”?

As a former council rejected a proposal for a conference centre on the newly proposed Merimbula art gallery site based on massive costs to provide infrastructure to the site alone, plus issues with Aboriginal heritage and environmental issues, what has changed? Or has this council simply ignored the obstacles in their attempts to move the regional centre south?

Tom William, Bega

Taught to love others

The postal plebiscite on the right of all couples to have their relationship recognised by marriage has not only created conflict within our community but also within individuals.

The competing voices of religious, political and community leaders, of tradition, of love for homosexual family and friends, and of calls for social justice, can make it difficult to decide how to how cast a vote.

Jesus during his ministry attended a wedding and offered a blessing to the couple.  I ask myself, can I imagine him also attending and blessing a marriage between a homosexual couple?  Personally, the answer has now become easy. Yes! 

Graham Jensen, Kalaru

Rethinking vote

You know, I was thinking of voting yes in the coming plebiscite. After all, I am a Christian and Jesus taught us to love one another.

Then the “rainbow warriors” started their bullying and I thought that is not very loving.

Attacking Christian churches and meetings, and trying to stop a democratic vote (should have been a referendum held at a general election – far less costly) while getting lots of headlines, is not the way to go about proving their point.

They have also caused me to think more deeply about my vote.

I know there are many really nice gay people out there – some of whom I am happy to cal my friends.

They have been able to live together in a perfectly harmonious, loving relationship for many years in a legitimate civil union, protecting their social and financial security.

Some even have children, whether naturally, by adoption or IVF. They do not need a state-sanctioned “marriage” to do so.

They do, however, need the help of someone of the opposite sex o make it happen, and that to me is not a true marriage.

So I will now be voting “no” to same-sex marriage, and reading Noel Carter’s letter in last Friday’s paper has only reinforced my views.

Elvie Preo, Bega