It was a boy, baby Taylor

NICE SURPRISE: While reading Looking Back on the BDN website Bill Taylor realised he was reading about his own birth.
NICE SURPRISE: While reading Looking Back on the BDN website Bill Taylor realised he was reading about his own birth.

While Bill Taylor was sitting in his caravan, clicking his way through the Bega District News website in late January he stumbled across something very familiar in the the regular Looking Back column.

He ran his eyes over an article on the late Bega doctor Ted Blomfield.

“During March 1949 the old nurses' quarters became the maternity unit and I delivered my first baby there on January 17, 1950. It was a boy, baby Taylor,” the article said.

A quick look at the date and he realised he was reading about his own birth.

Now aged 67, Mr Taylor said he could not believe what he was reading.

“I thought to myself ‘that’s my birthday, that could be me’,” he said with a smile.

“It’s pretty amazing isn’t it?”

Mr Taylor was the first baby to be born in the maternity ward of the now burnt out hospital and growing up in the 1960s he enjoyed everything that came with it.

He was named band manager of the group Undecided, containing Brian Nichol and Stephen "Fess" Parker who would later start the Australian pub rock band The Radiators, so he would be allowed to see the band’s gigs at Bega High School.

“I’m a year older than them, that’s why I was boss,” he said with a laugh.

“I became manager so I was allowed into the school because I had already finished.”

He said rock music was something the local RSL Club was not necessarily happy with, but something they could not refuse as it brought in the crowds.

“We all had long hair and if your hair hit your collar you weren’t allowed in,” he said.

“If you played music it didn’t matter, so they had to let us in and they hated it because we were a popular local band.”

After Nichol and Parker left for Sydney the band became known as the Pumpkin Flat Diggers and would earn $10 a night each for playing all night at local venues.

“We had a deal where if you left the band you could give it a new name,” he said with a laugh.

“We won a battle of the bands in Cooma and the guys still play around town as Angus Rump and the Chips.”