Brennan is augmenting his reality

AMBITIOUS: Game developer Brennan Hatton (right) will be visiting the Bega Valley for Regional Innovation Week. Picture: Supplied.
AMBITIOUS: Game developer Brennan Hatton (right) will be visiting the Bega Valley for Regional Innovation Week. Picture: Supplied.

Brennan Hatton describes himself as “a global ambitious adventurer looking for the best way to better the world” and he’s not wrong.

Mr Hatton’s drive to innovate, create and change the world is evident in not just his words but also his actions.

The game developer will be travelling to Bega on the “Innovation Riders” bus from Sydney on Friday for Regional Innovation Week’s Hackagong Bega event.

“On the bus down we’ll be designing an MMO (massively multiplayer online) style game where there will be a team of players on their phone playing against a virtual reality person,” he said.

“I’m hoping we’ll spend the whole time planning and designing, but we might spend the whole time sleeping – hopefully we will have a playable demo by the end of it all,” he said with a laugh.

Mr Hatton is fresh from spending three year’s in Silicon Valley working on augmented reality (AR) products for the renowned Meta Company.

Mr Brennan said that while augmented reality is an area set to boom economically, it does appear daunting to some people.

“It is actually not that difficult to learn,” he said.

”Augmented reality differs from virtual reality in that keeps you in the real world but we add digital content over the top.

Brennan Hatton stands on top of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park in the United States during a three day solo winter backpacking trip.

Brennan Hatton stands on top of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park in the United States during a three day solo winter backpacking trip.

“At the moment it is tailored for specific use cases but that will change.”

He describes his American experience as combining reality and fantasy, where he found himself working alongside the creator of the user interface from the 2008 Hollywood blockbuster Iron Man, visual artist Jayse Hansen.

“Originally we tried to recreate it and we realised he had done so much research that we decided to hire him,” Mr Hatton said.

He found himself working alongside 40 people inside a mansion hosting a three-storey room dubbed “The Meta Cathedral”.

Between working on his many simultaneous projects, he shares his knowledge and skills with children at Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum.

“It is almost limitless the potential we can do with this technology,” he said.