Daffodils bright symbols of hope for cancer’s end

Showing off some of the merchandise available of Daffodil Day in the special frame made for the day are Bega Cancer Council’s community program coordinator Jennifer Mozina and community relations coordinator Sarah Flynn.

Showing off some of the merchandise available of Daffodil Day in the special frame made for the day are Bega Cancer Council’s community program coordinator Jennifer Mozina and community relations coordinator Sarah Flynn.

A symbol of hope, daffodils have recently begun to bloom - which is timely as Cancer Council’s Daffodil Day is on Friday. 

“Daffodil Day is a way for the community to show that they care by purchasing something on the tables,” Bega Cancer Council community relations coordinator Sarah Flynn said. 

“For us it is about getting back into the vernacular as well - talking to people about their stories and the issues they care about.

“It’s also about getting the word out there about who we are and what we do.”

Two stalls will be in Bega - one in Ayres Walkway and one at the Sapphire Marketplace where people can have their photo taken in a Cancer Council frame to show their support for the organisation. 

Merchandise on offer includes pens, broaches, teddy bears, T-shirts and, of course, fresh bunches of daffodils.

A new quirk this year will be Glenn Cotter and his “Hairy Bikers” in Ayres Walkway selling merchandise and talking to passers-by about cancer support.

There will also be stalls in Merimbula, Eden, Narooma and for the first time, one in Cobargo. 

Ms Flynn said there is often strong support from the community on the day.  

“Daffodil Day is the one where people come up to the table and just throw money at you,” she said.

It is an important fundraising event for the organisation, and money raised on the day mainly goes into research, but also advocacy and support services. 

One of the most “incredible” parts of the day according to Ms Flynn is the way people from the community talk to the stallholders and share their cancer stories.

“It is definitely the day that people connect with you,” she said.   

“It’s going back to that symbol of hope, [the daffodil]. 

“For a lot of people, the first step on their journey is when they get their diagnosis and don’t know what to do, and that is what the Cancer Council comes in.” 

Bega Cancer Council community coordinator Jennifer Mozina said she is also keen to hear from local cancer patients about their experience with the chemotherapy co-payment

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